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Life Lessons Learned through a Toy Store

Along with Sylvia’s reaction to the fiberglass sailboat incident, another lesson for readers within this short story is the cultural differences the protagonist sees within Miss Moore. As a new member of the neighborhood, Miss Moore puzzles the local children with the way she carries herself including her appearance and speech. From Sylvia’s point of view, interactions with Miss Moore begin as forced outings that she must participate in. She’d been to college and said it was only right that she should take responsibility for the young ones’ education, and she not even related by marriage or blood (Cade Bambara 88). Upon reviewing the text, it is clear that as time passes, Sylvia begins to understand that Miss Moore is trying to show her and her friends the complex nature of social class in the world around them. After visiting F.A.O. Schwartz, Miss Moore poses this question for the kids to consider, Imagine for a minute what kind of society it is in which some people can spend on a toy what it would cost to feed a family of six or seven. What do you think? (Cade Bamara 95). Through this question, one can decipher from the text that when Sylvia looks at Miss Moore, she sees the necessity of learning to analyze the world around her to draw conclusions about society.When combining the reality of money of society with the new awareness that Miss Moore’s character represents, the last area for analysis within this short story is to discuss how Sylvia begins to learn…. By demonstrating how these kids react to these outrageously priced items, the lesson readers are exposed to is one of the often harsh realities discovering class. Along with Sylvia’s reaction to the fiberglass sailboat incident, another lesson for readers within this short story is the cultural differences the protagonist sees within Miss Moore. As a new member of the neighborhood, Miss Moore puzzles the local children with the way she carries herself including her appearance and speech. From Sylvia’s point of view, interactions with Miss Moore begin as forced outings that she must participate in. She’d been to college and said it was only right that she should take responsibility for the young ones’ education, and she not even related by marriage or blood (Cade Bambara 88). Upon reviewing the text, it is clear that as time passes, Sylvia begins to understand that Miss Moore is trying to show her and her friends the complex nature of social class in the world around them. After visiting F.A.O. Schwartz, Miss Moore poses this question for the kids to consider, Imagine for a minute what kind of society it is in which some people can spend on a toy what it would cost to feed a family of six or seven. What do you think? (Cade Bamara 95). Through this question, one can decipher from the text that when Sylvia looks at Miss Moore, she sees the necessity of learning to analyze the world around her to draw conclusions about society. When combining the reality of money of society with the new awareness that Miss Moore’s character represents, the last area for analysis within this short story is to discuss how Sylvia begins to learn the role of class in society. After

Life Lessons Learned through a Toy Store