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Rousseau John Stuart Mill and G D H Cole

Rousseau, John Stuart Mill and G. D. H. ColeAccording to Chapter II on a participatory Theory of Democracy, Rousseau, John Stuart Mill and G. D. H. Cole highly emphasize that Rousseau was a par excellence theorist of participation which is vital for the theory of participatory democracy. Rousseau effectively explains that his theory elaborately expounds the ultimate need of individual participation of every citizen in all political decision making. Thus, the participatory theory of democracy is a protective adjunct to a prescribed laid down institutional arrangements. The participatory theory of democracy has an in-depth psychological effect primarily on the participants by ensuring that there exists an interrelationship between the individual attitudes and psychological qualities and the working of institutions (Rousseau, Mill and Cole, 22).According to Rousseau, democracy is a system where citizens execute their democratic right of participation in the political system and also make the laws. Rousseau views are more of a direct system of citizens’ participation in the political system and not as a representative system. Thus, the participatory theory of democracy does not in any way conform to the definition of the classical democratic theory. For the participatory theory to be effective there should be certain economic conditions that are fundamental for the theory to work and be efficient. Thus, Rousseau strongly advocated for economic independence and economic equality (Rousseau, Mill and Cole, 23).In accordance to Chapter II on a participatory theory of democracy, absolute equality is not a necessity rather what is paramount is that the existing differences in economic equality should never be allowed to translate into political inequality. The ideal situation should ultimately ensure that there is no rich citizen who can buy another and there should be no poor citizen who will be forced to sell themselves. Thus, each person should be allowed to own property since this is the most valued citizen right. Citizens highly regard their own properties since it gives them the sense of independence and security. Ownership of property by the citizens will effectively translate to an individual’s necessary basis which rests his political independence and political equality (Rousseau, Mill and Cole, 25).I totally concur with the authors ideas since the participatory theory of democracy ensures that the citizens directly participate in the running of the political system. Unlike the representative system where citizens choose various people to represent them in the government, the participatory theory of democracy emphasizes on direct participation. The theory ensures that the citizens also make their own laws which are more of a right than a privilege. This creates the sense of ownership and governance which translates to better enhancement of interrelationships between the citizens and the political system (Rousseau, Mill and Cole, 31).The participatory theory of democracy effectively ensures that the citizens take part in making decisions which is a fundamental system of ensuring good government and protecting private interests. Thus this theory is elaborately designed to develop responsible, individual political and social action by way of an effective participatory process. The theory ensures a conducive political independence and political equality by making sure that the gap between the rich and the poor is effectively minimal. This will translate to a democratic system whereby the citizens will be free to make laws and participate in the political system without the fear of intimidation because of their economic status (Rousseau, Mill and Cole, 43).In Chapter III on The sense of political efficacy and participation on the workplace, the authors elaborately expound on the need to have certain psychological qualities that are paramount to ensure that a person effectively participates in the political system. The authors take an in-depth sight on both the participatory and contemporary theories of democracy and discuss the need of individuals learning the importance of democracy outside the national political process (Rousseau, Mill and Cole, 45).Works CitiedRousseau, Mill, John Stuart and Cole, G. D. H, a participatory theory of democracy, Chapters II. Pp. 22-44Rousseau, Mill, John Stuart and Cole, G. D. H, a participatory theory of democracy, Chapters III. Pp. 45

Rousseau John Stuart Mill and G D H Cole