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Attitudes values and job satisfaction

Business Problem Business Problem Dishonesty is one of the business problems I have encountered in my professional work experience. This problem cuts across many aspects of work and it can have devastating effects on both the organization and other target victims. Dishonesty in Recruitment During recruitment, dishonest selection defies the value of transparency and accountability making the organization to end up with half-baked or unqualified employees. Dishonesty during recruitment features when the individuals entrusted with screening and selecting potential employees ask for bribes and undeserved perks or recruits offer them willingly. This becomes a problem when the recruited personnel are unable to deliver on their mandate or bring the organization (Robins amp. Judge, 2013). Dishonesty in financial accounting, reporting and advising Financial accounting, reporting and advising are perhaps the areas plagued the most by the problem of dishonesty. Accountants fabricate financial statements in bid to either cover up for the company money they have used on personal spending, or for money they want to rob the organization. On the other hand, audit firms are bought into covering up a company’s dishonest or fraudulent financial deals hence reporting inaccurate information to regulatory agencies and authorities such as Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Some financial advisers collude with organizations in influencing potential clients to join their investment deals even when they would have objectively advised against them. Dishonest financial accounting, reporting and advising can affect negatively on organizational attitudes (Wilson, 2004). Effect of dishonesty on job satisfaction Dishonesty has adverse effects on job satisfaction. Rationalization makes dishonest employees justify their dishonest conduct on a cost-benefit analysis. The rewards that come with dishonesty are short-lived and they haunt when the person enjoying realizes that these rewards would have gone into helping other deserving people. Additionally, dishonesty affects job satisfaction when a person in the workplace, especially one in a senior position, unfairly denies an employee some benefits and gives them to another person. This is what happens when promotion opportunities are given to people undeservedly and unequally. Employees are dissatisfied with their work when dishonest conduct brings strife and wrangles amongst them (Robins amp. Judge, 2013). Lack of Proper Oversight Measures An issue that contributes to the propagation of dishonesty in the workplace is the lack of elaborate oversight measures. When incumbents are not assessed for dishonesty, it leaves a leeway for them to flout an organization’s culture and values. Some organizations lack proper mechanisms of scrutinizing the criteria used by the human resource department in recruiting new employees or employee some for promotion. Many organizations forego the need to have their financial accounting and reporting crosschecked by both internal and external auditors and this creates room for unscrupulous accountants to deal dishonestly. Whereas external auditors are crucial in overseeing honest financial accounting and reporting, they do not help when they have a dual relationship with an organization. This happens when external auditors are allowed to be investors in or partners with an organization they are supposed to oversee (Wilson, 2004). The scriptures warn against dishonesty and highlight its repercussions. Proverbs 12: 13 – 14 admonishes that lies lead to trouble but honesty vindicates. The passage further asserts that honesty brings satisfaction and rewards. In conclusion, dishonesty pervades many aspects of work life and has adverse effects on workplace attitudes, values, and job satisfaction. ReferencesRobbins, S. amp. Judge, T. (2013). Organizational behavior. Harlow: Prentice Hall. Wilson, T. (2004). Employee Dishonesty: National Survey of Risk Managers on Crime. Journal of Economic Crime Management, 2(1): 1 – 25.

Attitudes values and job satisfaction